THE MISSION

The Canadian Canoe Pilgrimage, brings together different cultures that form the fabric of Canada today. We are providing an experience of encounter that will encourage dialogue, reconciliation and friendship. We are immersed in the Calls-to-Action outlined in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

The Journey

A historic canoe voyage undertaken by Samuel de Champlain and Jean de Brebeuf in the care of their First Nations guides

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During the last five years, Canada has been engaged in uncovering the tragic history of residential schools through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

The goal of the pilgrimage is to promote a deeper intercultural dialogue and understanding

The pilgrimage will occur during the year-long celebration of Canada’s 150th anniversary of confederation

The paddlers

The paddlers will consist of Indigenous Peoples, Jesuits, English and French Canadians, men and women, young and old.

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The group of core paddlers will be expanded through an open invitation to people to join the paddlers at various key sites such as the French River Provincial Park, North Bay, the town of Mattawa, and Ottawa

By including representatives of French and English Canada and the First Nations, this pilgrimage will become an opportunity to enter into relationship and dialogue

The Route

This canoe route is an ancient Indigenous trading route connecting the St. Lawrence River to Lake Huron

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The paddlers will begin the pilgrimage at Sainte-Marie among the Hurons and Martyr's Shrine in Midland, Ontario on July 21, 2017 at the historical site of the Jesuit mission to the Wendat First Nation dating back to 1638

The final destination will be in the Montreal area on August 15, 2017

The Journey

A historic canoe voyage undertaken by Samuel de Champlain and St. Jean de Brebeuf in the care of their First Nations guides

LEARN MORE

During the last five years, Canada has been engaged in uncovering the tragic history of residential schools through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

The goal of the pilgrimage is to promote a deeper intercultural dialogue and understanding

The pilgrimage will occur during the year-long celebration of Canada’s 150th anniversary of confederation

The paddlers

The paddlers will consist of Jesuits from both the French and English Provinces as well as First Nations Peoples and Jesuit collaborators

LEARN MORE

The group of core paddlers will be expanded through an open invitation to people to join the paddlers at various key sites such as the French River Provincial Park, North Bay, the town of Mattawa, and Ottawa

By including representatives of French and English Canada and the First Nations, this pilgrimage will echo the original route made by St. Jean de Brebeuf and other Jesuits alongside the First Nations and Voyageurs in Canada's formative years

After reaching the French River, supply vehicles will follow the pilgrims to resupply and provide support. It is at this point that others will be invited to join the pilgrimage

The Route

This canoe route was first used by the various Aboriginal peoples who showed it to the early French missionaries and explorers

LEARN MORE

The paddlers will begin the pilgrimage at Sainte-Marie among the Hurons in Midland, Ontario on July 20, 2017 at the historical site of the Jesuit mission to the Wendat First Nation dating back to 1638

The final destination will be in the Montreal area on August 15, 2017

VIDEO

UPDATES

Want to stay up-to-date on the Canadian Canoe Pilgrimage and learn how you can get involved?  Send us your email and we will reach out when we have news.

THE PADDLERS

Meet the core group of paddlers who will be braving the elements to rediscover a past that unites a land.

Coming soon!

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Eu sumo maiestatis mea. Usu ei imperdiet persecuti. An integre aliquam intellegat duo, nam veri omnis dissentiunt et, blandit perpetua eos ex.

Michael Bertone

Seminarian
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Eu sumo maiestatis mea. Usu ei imperdiet persecuti. An integre aliquam intellegat duo, nam veri omnis dissentiunt et, blandit perpetua eos ex.

Ryan Hamilton

Photographer
Pic-1

Eu sumo maiestatis mea. Usu ei imperdiet persecuti. An integre aliquam intellegat duo, nam veri omnis dissentiunt et, blandit perpetua eos ex.

Jason Remy

Student
Pic-2

Eu sumo maiestatis mea. Usu ei imperdiet persecuti. An integre aliquam intellegat duo, nam veri omnis dissentiunt et, blandit perpetua eos ex.

Fr. Michele Garneau

Parish Priest
Pic-8

Eu sumo maiestatis mea. Usu ei imperdiet persecuti. An integre aliquam intellegat duo, nam veri omnis dissentiunt et, blandit perpetua eos ex.

Francois Reno

Seminarian
Pic-6

Eu sumo maiestatis mea. Usu ei imperdiet persecuti. An integre aliquam intellegat duo, nam veri omnis dissentiunt et, blandit perpetua eos ex.

Fr. Matthew Duncan

Seminarian
Pic-5

Eu sumo maiestatis mea. Usu ei imperdiet persecuti. An integre aliquam intellegat duo, nam veri omnis dissentiunt et, blandit perpetua eos ex.

Pierre Sauvignon

Researcher
Pic-4

Eu sumo maiestatis mea. Usu ei imperdiet persecuti. An integre aliquam intellegat duo, nam veri omnis dissentiunt et, blandit perpetua eos ex.

Manuel Solistine

Seminarian

COUNTDOWN

 

Paddlers will embark in:

THE ROUTE

The voyage will follow the shores of Georgian Bay to the French River, which will then move along the French River to Lake Nipissing. From Lake Nipissing, the pilgrimage will proceed along the Mattawa River to the Ottawa River. Paddlers will then travel down the Ottawa River to the St. Lawrence River and to their final destination in Montreal on August 15, 2017.

GET INVOLVED

The paddlers look forward to visiting different dioceses, reserves, towns and cities along their journey. If you would like to take part or help enrich this experience, reach out to us with your ideas.  Here are a few ideas we have as to how you could take part:

PRAYER AND REFLECTION

We would love to help you animate a prayer service in your local faith community. With our diverse group of paddlers, we have rich backgrounds in various spiritual traditions. Reconciliation and the environment are common themes that we can all reflect on together.

COMMUNITY BASED CELEBRATION

Help us organize an event in your community. We would love to engage in a multicultural celebration with each community we are stopping in. Sharing a meal together, listening to stories from our history, and hosting a presentation on intercultural dialogue are just some ideas of what a celebration might include.

BECOME PILGRIMS

If you enjoy canoeing consider joining the paddlers on the river for a couple of days. Participate in this experience first hand by canoeing with us.

PRAYER AND REFLECTION

We would love to help you animate a prayer service or mass in your local parish or faith community. With our diverse group of paddlers, we have rich backgrounds in various spiritual traditions. Reconciliation and the environment are common themes that we can all reflect on together.

COMMUNITY BASED CELEBRATION

Help us organize an event in your community. Let us celebrate together Canada’s 150th anniversary. We would love to engage in a multicultural celebration with each community we are stopping in. Sharing a meal together, listening to stories from our history, and hosting a presentation on intercultural dialogue are just some ideas of what a celebration might include.

BECOME PILGRIMS

If you enjoy canoeing consider joining the paddlers on the river for a couple of days. Participate in this experience first hand by canoeing with us.

THE HISTORY

Learn about the story behind the pilgrimage and what inspired our Paddlers to undertake this journey…

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Truth and Reconciliation

  • TRC Calls to Action
  • Collaborations

During the last five years, Canada has been engaged in uncovering the tragic history of the residential schools through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The Commission published Calls to Action, “in order to redress the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation.” (TRC Calls to Action) The Jesuits, acknowledging their role in the residential school in Spanish, Ontario, are committed to the healing and reconciliation process. The Jesuits were given the opportunity to read a Statement of Reconciliation at the TRC National Event in Montreal in April 2013.

For more than 165 years, Canadian Jesuits have been living and working continuously with the Ojibway, Odawa, and Potawatomi Nations mostly in Northern Ontario around Manitoulin Island and Thunder Bay. Seeking God’s presence in the lives of the Indigenous Peoples reinforces the belief that Indigenous cultural values are not only worth preserving, they must be celebrated and that all efforts possible be made to incorporate them into the broader Canadian context. Important then, is the attitude that the Jesuits be attentive to the gifts, the culture, and the spiritual hungers of the First Nations peoples.

We endeavour to share these gifts with those who prepare for local spiritual leadership and with those who gather to listen to the Gospel of Jesus Christ, tell their stories, and break bread in the Eucharist. The Spirit and Faith that animate this work justly reach into the needs of the communities, their internal struggles, and into the realities of the larger society that favours working with those living on the margins.

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JESUITS

  • Who We Are
  • History

The Society of Jesus was founded in 1540 by St. Ignatius Loyola, a Basque nobleman and soldier, and seven of his companions, who placed themselves at the disposal of the Pope for the service of the Catholic Church wherever the need was greatest. For more than 450 years, Jesuit priests and brothers have lived an amazing story of serving the Church in new and unexpected ways. We are still men on the move, ready to change place, occupation, method — whatever will advance our mission in the Church.

 

Today that “we” has expanded to include men and women who share this vision of service to faith and to the justice that faith demands. Together Jesuits and lay partners place ourselves in the presence of the God who created all people. We are committed to the service of faith, and this requires that we promote justice, foster dialogue between cultures and religions, and lovingly care for those the Lord puts in our path.

The Jesuits first set foot in what is now Canada, at Port Royal, Nova Scotia in 1611. At Ste-Marie, now Midland, Ontario, in 1639, the Jesuits built “a house of prayer and a home of peace,” (St. John Paul II) a community where aboriginal and non-aboriginal people were to dwell together in harmony, where the rites and traditions of both Europeans and Hurons could be strengthened and enriched by the values of the Gospel. But their plans got caught up in tribal warfare, in the intrigues of the French and English courts, in the politics of the fur and brandy trades resulting in the death of eight Jesuits along with many of the Huron people with whom they were ministering.

 

These eight Jesuits have been canonized: Jean de Brébeuf, Isaac Jogues, Gabriel Lalement, Antoine Daniel, Charles Garnier, Noel Chabanel, Réne Goupil, and Jean de laLande and are commonly referred to as the Canadian Martyrs.

 

After being suppressed for nearly 70 years, the Jesuits returned to Canada in 1842. Like their predecessors two centuries earlier, they came from France. After establishing themselves in Montreal they were called on to minister to the First Nation’s Peoples starting in Sandwich, Canada West, then on Manitoulin Island in Lake Huron.

CONTACT US

ADDRESS

43 Queen’s Park Cres. E.
Toronto, ON M5S 2C3

EMAIL

canoe.pilgrimage@jesuits.net

PHONE

(647) 850-5411